Flight Mechanic Concludes Four-Part Series on Nonmetallic Aircraft Materials

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

HOUSTON — Flight Mechanic, a top online resource for aircraft maintenance and repair professionals, announced the publication at of the final installment of the site’s four-part series covering nonmetallic aircraft materials. The most comprehensive and practical of its kind to be found online, the series has proven to one of Flight Mechanic’s most popular projects of recent years.

In the just-published final part of the series, readers will learn about natural and synthetic rubbers of all kinds and how they are typically used in modern aircraft, along with related materials like shock absorbing cord. Offering regular updates that help keep maintenance and repair professionals informed and aware of the latest developments in the field, Flight Mechanic is one of the most frequently visited websites in its niche.

“For quite some time now, our readers have been asking for a truly wide-ranging overview of the many nonmetallic materials that are regularly found in today’s aircraft,” Flight Mechanic representative Cory Doggett said, “We were proud to oblige them with our new series, and it has turned out be one of the best-received of the many we have published since our founding. We’re happy to report that the fourth and final installment of this popular series is now online at We think any aircraft maintenance technician will find plenty of interest in the series, and we promise to keep turning out useful, informative updates that target the things our readers care about.”

With the stakes inevitably being so high, the design of even the humblest of aircraft can present huge challenges to engineers. Aircraft must be light in order to get and stay aloft, even while they have to be strong to withstand the forces they encounter while in flight. In order to overcome these dilemmas and others, designers make use of a huge range of materials throughout the typical aircraft to most precisely satisfy the requirements relevant to each particular part.

This means that in addition to the aluminum, steel, and titanium that are so integral to many aircraft, mechanics and technicians can expect to encounter many more of nonmetallic kinds. The new Flight Mechanic series on nonmetallic aircraft materials guides readers through the whole range of these materials aircraft maintenance and repair professionals must be familiar with, how the materials behave, and how they must be treated and maintained.

From now-rare nonmetallic materials like wood that were once widespread to today’s high-tech composites, the four-part Flight Mechanic report is the single best resource for those seeking an accessible, functional grounding in this important subject. With the final installment now online along with the others at access, as with all Flight Mechanic updates, is free and open to all.

About Flight Mechanic:
A leading online destination for aircraft mechanics and maintenance technicians, Flight Mechanic serves up a steady stream of useful, informative updates and special features.

Source: http://studio-5.financialcontent.com/mi.kansascity/news/read/31925165

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